Illumine by Yujung Chang and Dan Holdsworth

Illumine by Yujung Chang and Dan Holdsworth

HCFA's second off-site exhibition in collaboration with The Assembly Rooms presents two contemporary Artists working in photography, both of whom share fascinations with the play of light and transcendent quality of illumination.

In their work, Chang and Holdsworth address, in a delicate and understated way, the politics and psychology of their subjected spaces. Abandoned factories and hauntingly 'empty' reed beds in Chang's installation series speak of the balance of gain and loss in the hyper-development of her native South Korea.In Holdsworth's photo a single lamppost, sublimely captured through a prolonged exposure on medium format film, becomes a shining beacon. Taken in Eindhoven (nicknamed 'The Light City') the stark, electrically lit image can be seen to relate to the city's industrial past. This unpopulated yet warm toned tableau gives the anticipatory sense of a stage awaiting the arrival of its players.

Exhibition continues from 15th December

PREVIOUS EXHIBITIONS

Troika's 'The Weather Yesterday'

Troika's 'The Weather Yesterday'

During Frieze Art Fair, HCFA presents Troika's 'The Weather Yesterday'; an electronic sculpture that takes pokes fun at our obsession with what's current and latest. Whether mobile devices, forecasting tools, interactive technology or simply pressing the 'refresh' button, man's dedication to being up-to-date at all times has taken on grotesque forms.

Standing little over 2 meters high, 'The Weather Yesterday' shows yesterday's temperature as if deviously encouraging viewers to engage with each other in small talk about the weather, shrewdly inviting us to idle away time on previous occurrences, shifting our attention from the single maverick 'forecast' to ponder over a commonality based on a shared 'past'.

Troika's works often bravely question the mindless pursuit of progress and technical innovation just for the sake of it and does so by proposing an alternative; a more candid and wide-eyed process that involves playful empiricism and experimentation.

Shown alongside ‘The Weather Yesterday’ is a selection of ‘Fahrenheit’ light drawings; delicate works on paper onto which an electric current has been set loose. These man-made capillary of tears, scorches and caresses form a micro-cosmos of nature’s riverbanks, blood vessels to lightning formations, celebrating the nature of energy which is inherently uncontrollable, but from which life ultimately emerges.

Private Viewing: Thursday 24 October
Exhibition continues from 25th October

The Tale of the Miraculous Sound of Wonderland by Yuki Mori

The Tale of the Miraculous Sound of Wonderland by Yuki Mori

Yuki Mori is a young Japanese artist currently working in Berlin. After a number of highly successful solo exhibitions in Sapporo (Japan) and Berlin, and following her first solo London exhibition at The Assembly Rooms we are delighted to welcome her return.

Yuki's current paintings address the way in which sensory input engages with our experience and memory and affects our interpretation of the visual world.

Her work invites us to explore our imaginary senses, translating the abstract shifting forms of clouds into figurative forms.

Yuki's imagery acts as a catalyst inviting us, the viewer, to become the interpreter and collaborator in the creative process.

The exhibition runs until June 28th.

The Savage Hills by Dan Beard

The Savage Hills by Dan Beard

Dan Beard’s new drawings and paintings draw inspiration from two seemingly disparate themes which, in fact, share a central idea; that of the ‘damsel in distress’ – more specifically, of cowboys protecting women, and gorillas abducting them.

The Western cowboy of popular culture is a knight itinerant, as of medieval folklore, who travels the landscape, abiding by a personal code of honour and rescuing women in danger. However, these cowboys possess such a sense of chauvinism, a product of the harshness of their existence, that their protective behaviour often verges on the ambiguous. What will be their reward?

Because of his experience within the set production trade, Dan has focused on the photographers’ attempts at drama in the posters and publicity shots of Hollywood Western films. These harshly lit, blatantly contrived scenes highlight the heroic, possessive posturing of the cowboy and the “protected” submissiveness of his girl.

Since Emmanuel Fremiet’s scandalous sculpture “Gorilla Abducting a Woman” was presented to the Salon in 1859, the image and idea of a woman in mortal and even sexual danger in the clutches of an ape has been embraced through popular culture from King Kong films to pulp comics, political propaganda to porno. As the journalist Andrew Erish points out: "Gorillas plus sexy women in peril equals enormous profits".

Here again is the damsel in distress, this time from brute animal power. Not only this, but often, due to the not-so-latent eroticism portrayed, she is also quite clearly in danger from a disguised form of sadomasochistic fantasy. The gorilla here represents a dark side of desire.

Private View: Thursday 2 May 6-8:30pm

Exhibition runs until 31st May 2013

Type Face by James Petrucci

Type Face by James Petrucci

James Petrucci’s practice explores concepts of archetype and mediated image, focusing in particular on representations of youth.

Employing source images found in the mass media Petrucci’s works appropriate the visual language of stereotype in order to question notions of superficial judgement. By using such images his portraits aim to provoke dialogue around the veracity of the photographic source.

Nietzsche speaks of challenging idols or dominant images by ‘sounding’ them out, or ‘playing upon them’ like musical instruments. In a similar way, Petrucci’s paintings intend to play upon established archetypes of youth as often presented by the media.

Reminiscent of domestic portraits, mug shots and media images the vigorous painterly gestures disrupt the photographic source. Fluid brushstrokes obscure the identities of the subjects detaching them from the specific media generated narrative and connotations of the original photograph.

The smeared marks imbue the paintings with a sense of loss and melancholy whilst the vacant eyes invite the viewer to relate to and even occupy these habitable bodies. Each of these vacant beings suggests a myriad of possibilities creating the air of a memento both joyful and poignant.

James Petrucci is a London based artist originally from the North of England. He graduated from Wimbledon College of Art with a Masters in Fine Art in 2011. He has exhibited throughout the UK including solo exhibitions in London and Yorkshire and a recent group exhibition at London’s Barbican Centre, which traveled to Beijing.

Private View: Wednesday 13th March, 6pm – 8pm

Exhibition runs until 26th April 2013

The Assembly Rooms present Three of a Perfect Pair by Ben Jamie

The Assembly Rooms present Three of a Perfect Pair by Ben Jamie

Benjamin Jamie’s paintings sit somewhere between reality and fantasy. His works represent the sense of optimism and redemption the natural world can bring in the face of ruin. With an inherent interest in the edge lands of the city, areas of transience, long overgrown and derelict, he wishes to capture something extraordinary within the commonplace of these forgotten places. His studio is situated right on the doorstep of the marshland and the Lea Valley in Clapton, so he is surrounded by this landscape, which is an area of great beauty, but wounded by its industrial past.

For this exhibition, Benjamin is showing for the first time his recent experiments with drawings and abstract paintings of pylons. In these works, there is an attempt to encapsulate the totemic and other worldly properties of these ziggurats, along with introducing elements that point to the symbolic, but without ever revealing their true meaning. With an interest in science fiction, Christianity, and psychogeography, his paintings are an exploration into lucid dreams and subjectivity.


Benjamin Jamie was born in Nottingham, and lives and works in London.

Private View 23rd January 6pm – 8pm

Exhibition runs until 2nd March 2013.

Delphine Hogarth

Delphine Hogarth

Private view Monday 10th September 6-9pm
Exhibition runs 11th September - 9th November

In her second solo exhibition with Zero10 Gallery Delphine Hogarth depicts her concern with disclosing feelings and moods. Her paintings represent men set in abstract backgrounds - this choice not to focus on a geographical place puts the male figures’ moods at the centre of the paintings, insisting that men do not belong to just one place. Their emotion links them to others as a social interaction. Geography and beliefs are purposely erased as they would interfere with the emotions captured in the paintings.

In these paintings Delphine talks about the representation of human emotions; there are fights, wars, love, beauty, sadness in Delphine’s paintings, but there is almost always only one human figure... one individual.

The paintings show a free brushstroke as they have been executed on the spur of the moment, due to Delphine’s changing lifestyle, but also with the idea that these paintings are about capturing men at a certain point in time.

Although not directly inspired by William Hogarth’s work, from whom she is a direct descendent, her concerns are the same - trying to understand the human condition and emotion.

The Assembly Rooms and Zero10 Gallery are thrilled to represent Delphine and show this exciting new body of work.


About the artist

Delphine Hogarth lives and works in London. Recent exhibitions include 20/21 International art fair, Royal College of Art, London (2011); People, Zero10 Gallery (2011); Debut, John Martin gallery, London (2010); Pre-Selection, BP Portrait Award, National Portrait Gallery, London, (2010); Room with a woman, Fat Galerie, Paris (2007); Slick Contemporary Art Fair, Fat Galerie, Paris (2006); The Hart and Fuggle pop up event, The rag factory, London (2010); Insect Women, rue d’Artois,Paris (2001)

Masaki Yada: Lost image in Memories

Masaki Yada: Lost image in Memories

Masaki’s meticulously rendered paintings show the culmination of his endeavour to bring forth the language of painting found in old masters’ paintings, whilst exploring ways in which painting as a medium becomes relevant to contemporary culture. His work is also a testimonial and an advocate of demands for quality and materiality rising amongst young artists and collectors rather than intangible conceptual art.

It is ubiquitous in contemporary art that artists attempt to bring dialogues of socio-political issues to the arena of aesthetics. As the role of art does have to be confined in the fabric of art for art's sake, it is a meaningful venture to explore the multiple facets of art. From the other perspective, however, it is the case in which art is being artificially politicised. An eminent German philosopher, Friedrich Hegel
famously predicted in the 19th century the arrival of the end of art, by arguing that art would soon be taken over by philosophy. As if attesting to this, in the mid 20th Century, the death of art was pronounced by an American art critic, Arthur Danto, on the sight of Andy Warhol's Brillo Box. In the face of it, a formalist approach to art seems to pose as an antithesis of this proliferating notion of art as a vehicle of political and social dialogues. By the same token, some might show scepticism as to whether or not the interpretation of old master's can be of the contemporary relevance. Indeed, there is an undeniable concern with how one can remark on prevalent issues of the 21st Century by means of ancient language.

Masaki asks:
“Every time I inspect a Vermeer at National Gallery, Girl at Virginal, I discover a new aspect that I was never aware before. My art praxis is like opening the coffins of old masters and to discover treasures that buried with them like golden daggers and jewels…but how do I smuggle the lexicon of old masters from the context of “genre painting” or “candle lit still life” to the contemporary terrain? I am not a philosopher, but merely observing the fluid vitality of nature under which all human activities are subsumed. I also regard myself as a messenger of our present-day concerns to the future. Language is pre-individual in that before my birth or formation of individual uniqueness it was invented and spoken and so is the language of painting. Hence, I intuited that by visiting great masters of the past, I would find a way of communicating to my descendant. This answers a question; why do I have to excavate and resurrect the virtuosity of the dead old masters? I am on the genealogy of what began a long time ago, which will be passed on from generation to generation .”

A naysayer may express uncertainty of the pertinence of such ancient language, however what has changed since Vermeer or Van Eyck? There are still human desires that ceaselessly precipitate wars and conflicts. “Life and Death, love and hatred, the rise and fall of empires, faith and betrayal, class struggles and the dominance of global capital, religious hostilities and advent of science in pursuit of truth, "will to power" and "eternal return," as Nietzsche says. Such timeless subjects as these interest me without dissipating. With this awareness, I see the relevance of ancient language to the present, moreover to the future,” says Masaki.

Masaki Yada was born in 1979 in Tokyo, Japan and lives and works in London. He has participated in a series of group exhibitions in London, Sweden, France Italy, Japan and the US, including “Florence Biennale” (2009), “The art of Display, Summerset House” (2010). Also, Masaki is the first prize winner of “Open West”, 2009.


For further information please email exhibition@zero10gallery.com or contact Johann Bournot on 07800 796 314

Gallery opening hours: Monday – Friday 10am – 6pm and Saturday by appointment
Address: 8, Silver Place, London, W1F 0JU

Private view Wednesday 27th June 6:00 – 830pm
Exhibition continues 28th June -17th August 2012

Robin Friend: With Sorrow Snare

Robin Friend: With Sorrow Snare

What Robin Friend's work manages to achieve, in a subtle, ironic and open-ended way, is to visually engage with human attitudes to what we call ‘Nature' in a manner that allows for many different interpretations.

On the one hand the images often allow themselves to fit into cultures of beauty: Whether it is the beauty of nature or decay, the images flirt with the kitsch that inevitably accompanies such questions. They frequently position themselves in the vicinity of certain old-fashioned aesthetics of disappearance, but they generously allow readings with contemporary relevance, and refrain from histrionic depictions of their themes.

Humans and the natural world are often at war in these images; we frequently see the detritus of some pitched battle, although it's never really clear who has the upper hand - as Friend says -"Nature is a destructive force. Yet so are humans". In the series Belly of the Whale, we see a torn shipwreck at the foot of cliffs, the photograph's slow exposure has turned the sea around the wreck into an ectoplasmic mist and the scene inevitably calls to mind the romantic destruction of Caspar David Friedrich's The Sea of Ice.
Douglas Murphy

Robin Friend born in 1983, is a British Artist based in London. Working predominantly with the medium of photography his work explores the increasingly chaotic relationship we have towards nature. He has exhibited internationally and in 2010 he was chosen to be part of the prestigious reGenaration2 - Tomorrow's Photographers Today. The selection was made with one key question in mind: is the photographer likely to be known in twenty years' time? Robin graduated with a Masters in Fine Art from the Royal College of Art in 2009.


For further information please email exhibition@zero10gallery.com or contact Johann Bournot on 07800 796 314

Gallery opening hours: Monday – Friday 10am – 6pm and Saturday by appointment
Address: 8, Silver Place, London, W1F 0JU

Preview Wednessday 4th April 2012
Start 6:30pm

Exhibition continues 5 April -18 May 2012

Big Face: Tom Howse

Big Face: Tom Howse

Through his paintings Tom Howse is trying to unearth a mythological investigation into the sources of understanding and the quests we take to comprehend.

Tom sees a distinct gulf between the world's knowledge and his own understanding. In his work he monumentalises figures or objects to bestow them with a greater power, all be it an irrelevant and superficial one, such as the "Big Face" which acts as a surrogate omnipotence, but also as a self-admonishing reconciliation for his personal inadequacies.

There is something quite primal about Tom's paintings, and the way in which colour and paint can work as a language to evolve an image beyond a physical depiction.

The London-based artist has been shortlisted for the Saatchi Gallery and Channel 4′s 2011 New Sensations Prize.


Private view: Wednesday 14th December 6:30 - 8:30 pm
Exhibition continues: 14th December - 10th February 2012

Monde Sauvage : Oliver Kosta-Thefaine

Monde Sauvage : Oliver Kosta-Thefaine

Oliver Kosta-Théfaine is a French artist who constantly plays with fire...literally. He uses a lighter in the most unique way, to burn designs into ceilings. It might be just another way of expressing yourself but it is surely one of the most unique.

Born in 1972, Olivier Kosta-Théfaine lives and works in Paris. In each of his creations, Olivier plays with the codes and clichés of popular culture. He uses the languages and codes of the city and its suburbs, changing or modifying their original meaning so it can be understood by a broader public.

Kosta-Thefaine's reflection is essentially based in rehabilitating the, often deconsidered, elements that belong to the city. His fascination for the suburbs has switched to a passion that is essential to his everyday work. The city is his muse, the drive for his artistic inspiration.

The Assembly Rooms and Zero10 are proud to present Olivier's first UK exhibition.

Private Viewing: Wednesday 21 September
Exhibition runs: 22 September- 9 December

PEOPLE : DELPHINE HOGARTH

PEOPLE : DELPHINE HOGARTH

In her first solo exhibition with Zero10 Gallery Delphine Hogarth depicts her concern about disclosing feelings and moods. Although not directly inspired by William Hogarth's work, from whom she is a direct descendent, her concerns are the same, trying to understand the human condition.

PEOPLE represents Delphine Hogarth's latest body of work. In her paintings she talks about the representation of human emotions (thoughts, emotions, conflicts, etc...).

In Delphine's paintings, the figures and people are captured in an abstract setting. They do not belong to a place. Their emotion links them not to others, as in social interaction, but to us as independent people. Geography and beliefs are purposely erased as they would interfere with the only emotion.

There are fights, wars, love, beauty, sadness in Delphine's paintings, but there is almost always only one figure... one individual.
Zero10 Gallery is thrilled to represent Delphine and show this exciting body of work. This new solo show coincides with the opening of Zero10's second exhibition space at 6 Silver Place.

Private view Wednesday 13th July 6-9pm
Exhibition runs 14th July - 16th September

Biostrata

Biostrata

BIOSTRATA

Adam Ball

Following Adam Ball’s recent success in Paris, Tel Aviv and London, Zero10 Gallery is pleased to announce his first solo exhibition at our new space in Soho.

The artist will be presenting a new body of work comprising of microbiological elements layered against a diverse range of images, contrasting the micro and macro, biological and electrical, chemical and natural.

These complex images were created using large sheets of acetate, each printed with separate visual component, hung from the studio ceiling and photographed. The resultant ambiguous ‘landscapes’ are both unrecognisably alien and instinctively familiar. The exhibition will consist of paintings and works on paper inspired from these photographs. A white felt cut out and LED light box will also be presented, before being exhibited later in the year at the Goss-Michael Foundation in Dallas, US.

Adam Ball (born in 1977) lives and works in London. Since the exhibition of The Tree (2002), a 32-foot high painting in London’s Golden Square, solo exhibitions include: Dirty Pattern, Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York; Graffiti Love, Goss-Michael Foundation, Dallas and Coexistence, Galerie Laurent Mueller, Paris. Adam has also exhibited at The Jerwood Drawing Prize; Becks Futures, ICA, London; ArteFiera Bologna and Taman Negara, Gagosian Gallery for New York Fashion week.

2011 exhibitions include: The Shape of Things, Ferrate Gallery, Tel Aviv, Israel and I am Solitary, Beers Lambert, London.

For further information please email exhibition@zero10gallery.com or contact Johann Bournot on 07800 796 314

Gallery opening hours:
Monday – Friday 10am – 6pm
and Saturday by appointment


Zero10 Gallery
exhibition@zero10gallery.com
www.zero10gallery.com

Let's Face It 7

Let's Face It 7

London Photographic Association Awards For Portraiture
Let's Face it 7

Welcome to the 2011 London Photographic Association awards for portraiture. The images in this exhibition illustrate the breadth of skill contained within the LPA. Entrants were asked to interpret the brief as they wished, and the result is the images you see in this exhibition. The photographers have stayed true to everything which defines great portraiture: intelligent character studies based on intimacy and intrigue.

We were delighted to receive entries from 16 countries representing a wide range of photographic styles, background and influences. Entries came from commercial and fine-art photographers, mirroring the reach of the LPA within today's photographic practice.

The LPA extends its thanks to all the photographers who entered the 2011 London Photographic Association awards for portraiture.
With thanks to this years judges:
Nick Hall is the Picture Editor of The Independent Magazine.
David Edmunds is Curator of the London Photographic Association’s Gallery 1839.
Alex Robertson is Deputy Picture Editor on the New Zealand Herald

Private View: Thursday 7th April 2011
Exhibition Runs from 4th April - 6th May 2011

The Assembly Rooms and Zero10 present Cadavre Exquis

The Assembly Rooms and Zero10 present Cadavre Exquis

Cadavre Exquis

Adam Ball – Gordon Cheung – Nikola Savic – Piers Secunda

Preview: Tuesday 1st March 2011 6:30-9pm
Exhibition Continues: 2nd – 31st March 2011

To celebrate its new location in Soho and collaboration with the assembly rooms, Zero 10 is pleased to bring together four artists who have forged the gallery’s ethos and “mental contagion” over the last 12 months.

Among Surrealist techniques exploiting the mystique of accident was a collective collage of words or images called the cadavre exquis (exquisite corpse). Based on an old parlour game, it was played by several people, each of whom would write a phrase on a sheet of paper, fold the paper to conceal part of it, and pass it on to
the next player for his contribution.

The technique got its name from the first game played, "Le cadavre / exquis / boira / le vin / nouveau" (“The exquisite corpse will drink the young wine”). These poetic fragments were felt to reveal what American poet Nicolas Calas characterized as the "unconscious reality in the personality of the group" resulting from a process of what Ernst called "mental contagion."

The inspiration for this exhibition is based on the similarity of the cadavre exquis collage and the curatorial process adapting the technique by assigning a section of the gallery’s four walls to each artist.

For the exhibition, Zero10 has commissioned each artists to unleash the power of their collective unconscious by drawing an exquisite corpse.

Adam Ball
The hidden order of nature and the apparent spiritual silence of the world’s oldest rainforest form the basis of these labour intensive works, which capture the timelessness and tranquillity of an isolated world while expressing their mystery and awe.

Born in 1977, Adam lives and works in London and has exhibited in galleries worldwide, including Goss-Michael Foundation, Dallas; Gagosian Gallery and Paul Kasmin, New York; Jerwood Space and ICA, London.

Gordon Cheung
A multi media artist, his work is a comment on commerce, capitalism, power, belief, control and destruction. Using diverse source of materials such as financial papers, Cheung combines sculpture, painting and animation to create dreamlike re-workings of symbols of contemporary global culture.

Born in 1975 in London. Cheung’s works are in international public and private collections including the Hirshhorn Museum, Whitworth Museum, ASU Art Museum and UBS Collection.

Nikola Savic
Savic’s trademark object machine forms take on star shape and stainless steel surfaces, those newly invented quasi-organic forms are this time more moderate and in tune with our current industrial reorganisation of form and object. Thes paintings are in close relationship to Post American Art where we can recall Jasper Jone’s stars and John Chamberlain’s car constructions.
Born in 1973 in Belgrade, Serbia, Savic lives and work in London. Recent exhibition St James’s on Piccadilly, Bonham’s, London; Moscow Art Fair; Museum of Contemporary Art Belgrade, Serbia.

Piers Secunda
Piers Secunda’s work has developed out of practical and theoretical feelings for paint as a sculptural material. Because this angle is under explored his work has a look entirely of its own. Since this is a new use of the material it is an unfolding story and works here reveal attempts to apply this visual language in different ways… they are a measure of Secunda’s excitement at the possibilities tat lie open to him.
Piers Secunda has work in collections internationally and has exhibited extensively in both the United States and the UK. Recent exhibitions include “The Earth Draws It” at Zero10 and will be exhibiting in “Hybridity and Mutation” at HRL Contemporary in April, and “Signal8” at the Cat Street Gallery, Hong Kong.

World Series

World Series

The Assembly Rooms presents 'Worlds' by Nick Alcock

Nick has a passion for all disciplines of photography and specialises in landscapes. He has been working for some time on the ‘World Series’ of images - eight of which are featured in this exhibition. Based on his original panoramic landscape photography, he endeavours to give a new slant to a familiar view.

Alcock aims is to intrigue the viewer with repeat patterns, visual richness, texture and colour to provide a magical, seamless and compelling image. The finished images are high resolution and are enhanced by large format printing which reveals even more detail.

He is also interested in the tactile relationship between illustration and photography involved in the actual act of photography and the computer manipulation of his ‘World’ images.

Nick graduated with a distinction in Graphic Design from Camberwell College of Art in 1972 and immediately started work as an art director and later as a creative director and head of art for many top London Advertising Agencies and Design Companies, for clients as varied as Kodak, Mercedes Benz, Renault, Nissan, Van den Berg, Del Monte, Black and Decker, Apple, Phillips, Glaxo Wellcome, Bayer, Boots and Proctor and Gamble.

At McCann Erickson Nick won two Creative Circle Gold Awards and three silvers for his work on the innovative Alka Seltzer campaign, together with New York One Show, London International and Clio awards for work on Dunlop Slazenger, Goodyear and Glaxo.

While Head of Art at Ayer Barker, Nick won Clios, London International Awards and Creative Circle Golds for work on Save the Children, Plessey, Addis and Thistle Hotels.

Nick has been running a successful freelance design and advertising practice for the last twenty years working on everything from TV commercials to book and web design.

Since leaving art school, Nick has always been involved with his own personal projects and, in recent years, photography has taken a major role in his creative life. Photography was an integral part of his course at Camberwell, where he particularly enjoyed the darkroom manipulation and processing work. With the advent of Photoshop and digital photography, Nick realised that he could use these skills in many different creative ways.

Nick Alcock 'Worlds'
Private view on Thursday 27th January 2011
at the Assembly Rooms
Exhibition runs until 28th February 2011

Dialectic: Consequences of Enlightenment

Dialectic: Consequences of Enlightenment

The Assembly Rooms presents ‘Dialectic: Consequences of Enlightenment’; the second exhibition by East London-based painter Ben Jamie. Drawing together elements from existing but disparate landscapes, Jamie’s paintings imagine new places: an abandoned car rests amongst trees under an urban light; a derelict housing block emerges from a forest clearing; an industrial complex in the desert evolves into a craggy, alpine backdrop.

Seamlessly merged but contradictory, Jamie’s reconstructed terrains often take on a haunting quality, revealing a dystopian interpretation of the world around us. Charming images of the natural environment are neatly and lucidly disturbed by urban detritus; Jamie harnesses the connotations associated with each, allowing the viewer an alternative experience of the scenery we know.

The exhibition will be made up of a series of large oil on canvas paintings that build upon previous work.

Ben lives and works in East London. He has exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, Flowers East Gallery and the Assembly Rooms Gallery. To view more of his work visit www.benjamie.com.

Paul Wuensche

Paul Wuensche

PAUL WUENSCHE

Paul Wuensche completed his MFA at the New York Academy of Art in 1999. Exhibitions include the BP Portrait Awards, The Discerning Eye and the Royal Society of Portrait painters, amongst many others.

He paints solely from life. Having started at an early age the act of painting is instinctive and visceral. Although a representational painter, he is motivated by form and colour almost in an abstract sense. Although there is no conscious narrative, no symbolism or allegory in his work, the objects and people he paints hint at their own story. He likes to be a vehicle for what he sees rather than consciously superimposing any style or interpretation. The visual world is vivid and exciting enough in itself. The artist's role is to be truthful and at most to magnify.

Although a lot of the paintings are nudes, portraiture is central to his work. Even a foot or a knee is a clue to the individuality of the model, and even in still life he likes to think of a fruit or a bottle as having a ‘character’ that he must remain true to. He sees sensuality in objects no less than in the human form, especially in the way they are caressed by light and their colour bounces from one to the other.

His influences are many and varied although his favourite artists are the most painterly: Velasquez, Chardin, Freud. In drawing he likes the work of Maillol, Degas and Proudhon.

The Assembly Rooms presents Strange Bedfellows 2 - A Photographic Collection curated by Sue Golden

The Assembly Rooms presents Strange Bedfellows 2 - A Photographic Collection curated by Sue Golden

Photography has the power to evoke and arouse, capturing and illuminating situations, revealing perspectives on lives, places and situations. Strange Bedfellows utilises this potential and is a conceptual presentation in two parts.

In these exhibitions the tapestry of life is exposed in all its fragmented complexities. Here the quotidian mixes with the topical, the enigmatic with the provocative, sometimes twisted.
What’s particular is the image unions, the commonalities and the questions they provoke whether its degrees of isolation, modern identity or explorations of normality.

Strange Bedfellows is an eclectic mix of contemporary, international photographers’ images that have been chosen for their context and connections to the highs and lows of the Zeitgeist: the contrasts and disparities, the illusions and realities. They form striking exhibitions that explore the poignant, the paradoxical and the absurd.

The images have been selected from the fine art, commercial, established and up-and-coming photographers’ collections at the London Photographic Association and Gallery 1839.

Curated by Sue Golden

The Assembly Rooms
8 Silver Place
London W1F 0JU
Mon-Fri 10-5

Strange Bedfellows 2
Private View: Tues 2 November 2010 6-9pm
Exhibition: 3-19 November

www,London-photographic-association.com
www.gallery1839.com
tel: +44 (0) 20 8392 8557

The Assembly Rooms presents Strange Bedfellows - A Photographic Collection curated by Sue Golden

The Assembly Rooms presents Strange Bedfellows - A Photographic Collection curated by Sue Golden

Photography has the power to evoke and arouse, capturing and illuminating situations, revealing perspectives on lives, places and situations. Strange Bedfellows utilises this potential and is a conceptual presentation in two parts.

In these exhibitions the tapestry of life is exposed in all its fragmented complexities. Here the quotidian mixes with the topical, the enigmatic with the provocative, sometimes twisted.
What’s particular is the image unions, the commonalities and the questions they provoke whether its degrees of isolation, modern identity or explorations of normality.

Strange Bedfellows is an eclectic mix of contemporary, international photographers’ images that have been chosen for their context and connections to the highs and lows of the Zeitgeist: the contrasts and disparities, the illusions and realities. They form striking exhibitions that explore the poignant, the paradoxical and the absurd.

The images have been selected from the fine art, commercial, established and up-and-coming photographers’ collections at the London Photographic Association and Gallery 1839.

Curated by Sue Golden

The Assembly Rooms
8 Silver Place
London W1F 0JU
Mon-Fri 10-5

Strange Bedfellows 1
Private View: Tues 5 October 2010 6-9pm
Exhibition: 6-29 October

Strange Bedfellows 2
Private View: Tues 26 October 2010 6-9pm
Exhibition: 3-19 November

www,London-photographic-association.com
www.gallery1839.com
tel: +44 (0) 20 8392 8557

The Assembly Rooms presents Yuki Mori - Inside The Outside - Watercolours 2009-2010

The Assembly Rooms presents Yuki Mori - Inside The Outside - Watercolours 2009-2010

The Assembly Rooms present the latest exhibition from Yuki Mori.
After solo exhibitions in Sapporo and Berlin, The Assembly Rooms is proud to present the first exhibition of her work in London.

Born in Japan and working from Berlin since 2007, Yuki Mori's recent work has been an exploration of the way in which sensory input is translated by the individual to become experience and memory, and how this in turn becomes our basis for interpretation.

The paintings themselves engage the viewer in the role of interpreter, inviting you to enter a world of your own imagination in much the same way as a child finding forms in shifting clouds.

In effect the work acts as a catalyst, prompting a kind of child like daydream reverie that highlights the role of the observer as creator of that which is observed.

http://yukimori.jimdo.com

The Assembly Rooms presents An Exhibition of Portraiture

The Assembly Rooms presents An Exhibition of Portraiture

Let's Face It 6

The 2010 London Photographic Association Awards for portraiture demonstrates the vitality and excellence of portrait photography. As always we encourage photographers to interpret the brief in the widest sense, portraying their subjects with emphasis on their identity as individuals.

With entries arriving from twenty countries the exhibition is an eclectic mix of styles and peoples. From Russia to Africa, the Indian sub-continent and all points in-between photographers have captures their subjects with humour, intelligence and respect.


At The Assembly Rooms
8 Silver Place
London W1F 0JU

Private view: Thursday 31st March 2010 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm.
Exhibition runs until 29th May 2010.

www.london-photographic-association.com
kevin@lpa-management.com
+44 (0) 20 8392 8557

FALLING IN LOVE IS A RISK                                 Yang Du's whimsical fashion exhibition

FALLING IN LOVE IS A RISK Yang Du's whimsical fashion exhibition

"I am happy when people tell me that my collection made them laugh."

A painter from the age of five, Yang Du only devoted herself to fashion design when she realised that it could be a medium of artistic expression in itself. With her surrealistic world of knitted pork chop jumpers, cactus hats and tuxedos with elephant headwear and clever sense of irony, Du has effortlessly caught the eye of the press and public alike.

"My previous two collections are like my travel diaries..."

Influenced by Franco Moschino, Du maintains a legacy of the idiosyncratic, insisting on the narrative behind the design. She has a strong tendency to project her ideology through her work, based on a unique design process that often begins with a journey to exotic locales. There she collects the thoughts, objects, and sketches that lead to the final collection.

Falling In Love Is A Risk is not another exhibition of Yang Du's collections. It is an invitation to take an intimate look inside her whimsical mind and the unseen travel diaries that preserve the moments of inspiration for her wonderfully extraterrestrial fashion designs.

www.tien.org.uk

FALLING IN LOVE IS A RISK at
The Assembly Rooms
8 Silver Place
London W1F 0JU

Private view: Saturday 10th October 2009 11:00 am to 9:00 pm.

Exhibition runs until 27th November 2009.

The Assembly Rooms present ALREADY NOT YET by Ben Jamie

The Assembly Rooms present ALREADY NOT YET by Ben Jamie

With references to Ben's surroundings in Hackney his work is strongly influenced by Ballardian and Orwellian themes; creating dystopian worlds and questioning the distinction between our dreams and the reality of where we could be going.

"Already Not Yet is a reaction against artistic sensibility. Ben consciously isn't painting a pretty 'utopian' seascape or a lifelike portrait; rather he draws the viewer into a world that might be. By desaturating perceived views of society; stagnation, directionless and apathy, Ben is exposing idiosyncratic fault lines in our 'instant' culture."
(Ewan Eason, 2009)

ALREADY NOT YET at
The Assembly Rooms
8 Silver Place
London W1F 0JU

Private view: Thursday 20th August 2009 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm.

Exhibition runs until 2nd October 2009.

The Assembly Rooms present CONSTRUCTED EVIDENCE

The Assembly Rooms present CONSTRUCTED EVIDENCE

A photographic exhibition by members of the London Photographic Association.

Curated by Kevin O'Connor the exhibition includes the work from twelve internationally known fine art and commercial photographers.

The Constructed Evidence exhibition investigates the influence that digital technology has on the making of photographic images today. The way in which we view, and perceive truth when looking at a photograph.

The use of digital post production techniques have become key to the aesthetic and styling of photographic images. From the subtle conditioning of a picture to the seamless ability to create illusions.

London Photographic Association at
The Assembly Rooms
8 Silver Place
London W1F 0JU

Private view: Thursday 25th June 2009
Exhibition runs until 15th August 2009
View: Every Wednesday from 10:00am - 3:00pm

The Assembly Rooms present the latest exhibition from Philip Diggle

The Assembly Rooms present the latest exhibition from Philip Diggle

Born in Manchester, Diggle's early work was a reaction to the political climate of the late 70s and early 80s. He became immersed in the punk movement, painting live on stage, capturing the zeitgeist of that era.

Diggle has carried this live energy through to his present day work.

As Mel Gooding puts it:

'Diggle works continuously with chance but leaves nothing to it. His paintings are the sum of a multitude of split-second decisions, interspersed with hours of contemplation, over weeks or months. Their rhythms and counterpoints of colour, and of light and darkness; their textual complexity; their structural tensions; their objective density and weight: these are the pay-off of a fiercely commited energy and of an undivided attentions to the work in hand.'

His latest exhibition, 'I IS SOMEONE ELSE: Soho Review' is part of a series known as 'The Camden Chronicles'. It stems from his experience living in a squat in Camden in the early 80's. He became interested in the idea of the outsider. He was influenced by the work of French poets Rimbaud and Verlaine, who had lived in the area. They had posed existential questions, seeking the real truth as opposed to the truth fed to them by the establishment. These themes have proved to be very significant in Diggle's work and are at the forefront of this new exhibition.

The Assembly Rooms
8 Silver Place
London
W1F 0JU

Tel: 020 7437 1052

Exhibition runs from 11th May until 20th June 2009

Private View: Thursday 14th May 2009

Open Day: Saturday 16th May 2009

The Assembly Rooms present the work of Chris Orr, one of Britain's best-known printmakers

The Assembly Rooms present the work of Chris Orr, one of Britain's best-known printmakers

Chris Orr studied at Ravensbourne and Hornsey Schools of Art before completing an MA at Royal College of Art, graduating in 1967.

He was elected Royal Academician in 1995 and Professor of Printmaking in the Royal College of Art in 1997.

He was awarded an MBE in the 2008 Honours List and was also honoured as a Senior Fellowship and Professor Emeritus from the Royal College of Art.

His work is represented in numerous public and private collections including the Tate Gallery, Victoria and Albert Museum and the National Portrait Gallery. He has had regular solo shows at Jill George Gallery since 1978.

Chris paints and draws what he sees inside his mind and outside in the world he lives in. Within his mind is a teeming panorama of remembered and re-invented images, outside in the fresh air, he works with an investigative eye that gets into every nook and cranny.

The hallmark of his work from his earliest drawings to the present day is a love of detail. If he is drawing Manhattan or his native London, he gives attention to every last drop of detail in front of him. Equally, when he confronts his inner world, no scrap of memory or idea is ignored. The apparently trivial may be given as much attention as the important. The viewer is presented with a riot of images. Ribald humour co-exists with deadly seriousness.

His many collectors report that when they have filled their houses with his work (and before they move to a bigger place in order to expand their collection) they find that the pictures go on revealing themselves. Just when you thought you had got the measure of what Chris Orr is all about, you notice something new in the work and that raises a whole new set of questions.

The Assembly Rooms
8 Silver Place
London W1F 0JU

Tel: 020 7437 1052

Exhibition runs until 8th May 2009

In association with:

Jill George Gallery
38 Lexington Street
London W1F 0LL

Web: www.jillgeorgegallery.co.uk

The Assembly Rooms and Gallery 1839 introduce new Israeli talent to London market

The Assembly Rooms and Gallery 1839 introduce new Israeli talent to London market

Gallery 1839 is hosting an exclusive, solo exhibition of 'Exile: an image of women, women as an image' by acclaimed Israeli artist and photographer Lea Golda Holterman at The Assembly Rooms in Soho.

Golda Holterman, BA honours graduate of the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem, spent 18 months documenting the lives of prostitutes in the region. Until 2008, prostitution was a punishable offence in Israel. Golda Holterman explains what's behind her images:

"I decided it was important for me to look at this community of women of lost identity not as segmented bodies but as whole individuals. I wanted to code the genetics of prostitution. I feel that prostitution is a concept, a cultural legitimate behaviour and a common myth that should be reviewed."

Golda Holterman believes, women's bodies have become normalised as sexual objects in the media of Western society, particularly photography. The danger of this approach is that the person becomes an object which can be used and disposed of.

"For me, photography is a medium of observation. Through photography, I create an alternative way to observe that a pattern of myth exists in reality: women as a perishable object of desire. If the viewer can stay with the sense of humanism, I will have achieved my goal."

Gallery 1839 at
The Assembly Rooms
8 Silver Place
London W1F 0JU

Private view: 27th November 2008

Exhibition runs until 13th February 2009

View by appointment only: Every Wednesday from 10:00am - 3:00pm

Open Saturday 24th and Sunday 25th January 2009

Telephone 0208 392 8557

Online at www.gallery1839.com from the 26th November 2008.

Prints can be purchased from the online gallery.

All enquiries should be addressed to Kevin O'Connor

Tel: 020 8392 8557
Mob: 07768 275075
Email: kevin@gallery1839.com

Sponsors:

The London Photographic Association (LPA)
The Assembly Rooms

Site designed and developed by ALBATES.COM